News-in-Transition

18 February 2018

Are You Making Bad Choices? - Have you noticed that the same problems keep coming up in your relationships or at work?

Maybe you’re someone who keeps regaining the weight that you’ve lost or whose blood sugar is managed for a while but then invariably is out of control again?

Maybe you repeatedly experience bullying by your boss or colleagues? Maybe you keep choosing friends or a partner who treats you poorly?

Have you ever wondered why the same problems keep reoccurring in your personal and professional life?

There’s a very simple and straightforward answer to this: You’re making the same bad choices, over and over again.

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16 February 2018

 - We’d all like to be a little happier.

The problem is that much of what determines happiness is outside of our control. Some of us are genetically predisposed to see the world through rose-colored glasses, while others have a generally negative outlook. Bad things happen, to us and in the world. People can be unkind, and jobs can be tedious.

But we do have some control over how we spend our leisure time. That’s one reason why it’s worth asking which leisure time activities are linked to happiness, and which aren’t.

In a new analysis of 1 million U.S. teens, my co-authors and I looked at how teens were spending their free time and which activities correlated with happiness, and which didn’t.

We wanted to see if changes in the way teens spend their free time might partially explain a startling drop in teens’ happiness after 2012 – and perhaps the decline in adults’ happiness since 2000 as well.

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9 February 2018

 - For far too long, but particularly in the modern, Western world we have thought of the heart as simply a pumping mechanism responsible for bringing blood to our organs.

The heart’s physical importance not to be underestimated, it supports life, sending the blood of life to the tree-like limbs of our vascular system – but this is an overly simplistic view of what the heart is capable of.

Gregg Braden’s latest research elaborates on the ancient technique of using the heart as an intelligent organ.

The heart’s intelligence has been ignored for far too long. What we’ve learned about the heart’s wisdom, however, in the past several years through the Heart Math Institute and through the research of psychologists, neurobiologists, and res-surfaced wisdom teachings from our ancient past – should inspire everyone to look at the heart in a completely new way.

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6 February 2018

 - In Western society, we’ve been trying to fight this crippling stigma in one way. We tell depressed and anxious people: This isn’t happening to you because you are weak. It is happening to you mainly because there is a problem inside your brain.

Three decades after this approach began, where are we? Now 1 in 5 Americans has taken a psychiatric drug and every year, the depression and anxiety crisis gets worse, while the stigma isn’t shrinking. I spent three years researching this subject to find out why — and to see if there is a better way to find our way out of the stigma, and out of depression.

According to some of the most distinguished scientists in the field, depression is not caused by a chemical imbalance in our brains. The World Health Organization, in fact, finds that the causes are largely “social.” They are not primarily in our heads, but instead largely in the way we are living today. I found evidence playing out all around us.

For example, if you have no control over your work, you are far more likely to become depressed. If you are lonely, you are far more likely to become anxious. If you go through a traumatic childhood, you are 3,100 percent more likely to attempt suicide as an adult. This points to a very different way out of depression.

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27 January 2018

We think our money is our worth - Money is a touchy subject. That’s because most of us, to a certain degree, associate a lot of our self-worth and identity with our job and how much money we make. It is, quite literally, a market valuation of our skills and competence as a person, and therefore we all get a little bit testy and scooch around uncomfortably in our chairs whenever money is brought up.

But money is merely an arbitrary store of value. It is not value itself.

There are many stores of value in life. Time is a form of value. Knowledge is a form of value. Happiness and other positive emotions are a form of value. Money is often just the vehicle of interchanging these various forms of value with one another.

Money is not the cause of wealth in one’s life. It is the effect. Similarly, when people assume that money is the cause of their problems, they are actually mistaken. Money is usually the most noticeable effect of their problems.

Money is fluid. Its value only becomes realized when it’s put into motion. Therefore, money is a reflection of the owner’s values and intentions.

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26 January 2018

 - Recently, scientists discovered that plants could absorb energy from other plants in a groundbreaking study. Due to this, the entire scientific world could be turned upside down, because of the fact that it would provide evidence that humans could absorb energy from one another in a similar manner.

The research team was lead by Dr. Olaf Kruse, and for the first time ever, they were able to prove that the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can not only engage in photosynthesis, but that is can also draw an alternative form of energy. This energy would come from various other plants located around the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The study was then published in the Nature Communications journal online.

In order for us to grow, we need necessary energies such as calories from food, minerals from water, oxygen, and sunlight drawn from our surroundings. Conversely, plants need sunlight, food, and water as well, along with carbon dioxide.

In order to conduct his study, Kruse and his team of researchers planted the tiny green alga species and then observed it during a period when it was unable to receive its typical sources of energy. Due to their shortage, they began pulling energies from single-cell plants located around them. They were able to accomplish this by creating enzymes which digested the cellulose from the other plants in order to grow.

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19 January 2018

 - There is a meditation practice within Tibetan Buddhism called Sky Gazing it comes from the Meditation tradition of Dzogchen – which strongly emphasises resting in a natural state free from conceptual elaborations. This natural state is wide open, clear and lucid; it neither rejects anything or clings to anything and is sometimes referred to as spontaneous awareness. It is spontaneous because nothing has manufactured or created it, like having to meditate or having to be calm.  It always has been there and therefore is also called primordial awareness.

The clear blue sky is the closest external example of what this natural state is like. The clear sky is also a metaphor for the natural states indestructibility. Just like the sky is not affected by the passing weather neither is our natural state stained by thoughts or emotions no matter how strong they may be. This is a liberating view in the field of meditation. No longer do you have the idea that you have to purify and remove all the negative states of mind, now there is a teaching that directly points to an aspect of yourself which is your essential nature. This nature is pure right from the beginning and accessing that awareness is what sky gazing skilfully aims to do.

Sky gazing is apart of the Dzogchen tradition which is considered the highest spiritual path within Tibetan Buddhism and has been kept secret and only given to the most devout students, but as one Meditation Master has said in these times of strong materialism, chaos and disturbing emotions there needs to be an equally strong practice that can counter those negative forces and sky gazing is a practice that can do just that.

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14 January 2018

- It seems there could never be enough empathy and compassi n in our world, but we are starting to discover that our capacity for empathy to share the emotions of others and take their perspective can come with a bit of a sting if we’re not careful. If we get caught up on the misfortunes of others without understanding life’s processes, it can make us angry and unhappy. So where do we draw the line?

Fortunately, work on locating the root of empathy in the brain has also led to the discovery that with the right training, we might be able to tune how much we let others’ emotions affect us. This could allow us the best of both worlds — to care, without letting it consume us.

While culture might be socializing people into becoming more individualistic rather than empathic, research has uncovered the existence of “mirror neurons,” which react to emotions expressed by others and then reproduce them.

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7 January 2018

Less than 8 hours sleep can let you face the situation of depression - People with anxiety and/or depression often think that they have some moral defect to cause their ruminating, intrusive thoughts. But this couldn’t be further from the truth. It is not your fault, at all. There are many factors that modern Westerners simply don’t take into account.

Sleeping less than the eight hours per night is associated with intrusive, repetitive thoughts like those seen in anxiety or depression, says new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

The researchers discovered that regular sleep disruptions are associated with difficulty in shifting one’s attention away from negative information. This may mean that inadequate sleep is part of what makes negative intrusive thoughts stick around and interfere with people’s lives.

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5 January 2018

Collectively non-doing - Before they are able to enter a new story, most people—and probably most societies as well—must first navigate the passage out of the old. In between the old and the new, there is an empty space. It is a time when the lessons and learnings of the old story are integrated. Only when that work has been done is the old story really complete. Then, there is nothing, the pregnant emptiness from which all being arises. Returning to essence, we regain the ability to act from essence. Returning to the space between stories, we can choose from freedom and not from habit.

A good time to do nothing is any time you feel stuck. I have done a lot of nothing in the writing of my book. For several days I was trying to write the conclusion, spinning my wheels, turning out tawdry rehashes of earlier material. The more I did, the worse it got. So I finally gave up the effort and just sat there on the couch, a baby strapped to my chest, mentally traveling through the book I had written, but with no agenda whatever of figuring out what to write. It was from that empty place that the conclusion arose, unbidden.

Do not be afraid of the empty place. It is the source we must return to if we are to be free of the stories and habits that entrap us.

If we are stuck and do not choose to visit the empty place, eventually we will end up there anyway. You may be familiar with this process on a personal level. The old world falls apart, but the new has not emerged. Everything that once seemed permanent and real is revealed as a kind of hallucination.

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23 December 2017

 - This simple grounding exercise helps children feel stable, calm, and focused.

Trees provide the perfect example of the importance of staying grounded to be strong. Grounding does for us what roots do for trees. When we are grounded, we feel strong and able to handle anything that comes our way, just like the roots of the trees hold them steady when the strong winds blow.

Often times, simply being out in Nature, hugging a tree, or barefoot on the grass is enough to stabilize and calm our energy. But, sometimes we need to do more.

Try imagining yourself as a tree. Imagine your back as a trunk and that you have long roots that grow from the bottom of your feet, deep into the Earth.

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16 December 2017

- Our intuition develops when we are babies, long before are indoctrinated into Newtonian physics – which largely prohibits us from understanding the quantum world. Ironically, one of our first intellectual abilities – intuition – may be one of the greatest forms of intelligence we will ever experience in a “grown-up” world.

In the quantum world, there are no “positions” nor “speed.” These are classical, mechanical terms for a world that doesn’t really exist. Yet, as tiny babies we understand how things work without having a clear grasp of certain intellectual realities.

Psychologists Susan Hespos from Northwestern University, and Renee Baillargeon of University of Illinois found that this physical intuition kicks in as early as two and a half months, and other scientists think that intuition is probably present from birth.

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12 December 2017

 - All of us experience anxiety on occasion – it is a normal part of life. Our health, finances, jobs, and family all can cause us to worry at times.

And, sometimes we experience feelings of nervousness, restlessness, and stress without knowing exactly what is provoking those feelings.

Fortunately, there are simple things we can do to alleviate or better manage anxiety.

Here are 21 easy ways to calm yourself down and relax when a wave of worry hits you.

1) Breathe: Deep diaphragmatic breathing is a powerful anxiety-reducing trick because it activates the body’s relaxation response. It helps your body shift from the fight-or-flight response of the sympathetic nervous system to the relaxed response of the parasympathetic nervous system. Marla W. Deibler, PsyD, a clinical psychologist, suggests slowly inhaling to a count of 4, filling your belly first and then your chest, gently holding your breath to a count of 4, and slowly exhaling to a count of 4. Repeat several times.

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Calendar of Events

Group distant healing events planned for 2018:

20 March - Equinox

21 June - Solstice

22 September - Equinox

21 December - Solstice

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